Jobs for retirees who can’t afford to retire

Posted on: 9:49 pm, May 18, 2012, by , updated on: 12:02pm, May 19, 2012

If you’re on the job hunt, you could be facing some competition from your parents or grandparents.

Worried they won’t have enough money for retirement, many Coloradans are now working well into their 60s, 70s and 80s.

Becky Quinones is 63, working two part time jobs, while taking care of her 92-year-old dad and 83-year-old mom at the same time. She works 14 hour days at an age when most people are thinking about retirement.

“Car insurance, life insurance, car payment, house payment. Too much going out, not enough coming in,” said Quinones.

She’s among the millions of Americans who’ve delayed retirement, or may never retire. With slumping retirement savings, poor property values, and the loss of longtime, high-paying jobs, for many the nest-egg is gone. In one recent Associated Press survey, one in four workers predicted they’d never be able to retire.

“Almost everybody I know is trying to carry two, maybe three jobs if they can get it in,” Quinones told us.

For those looking to keep working past the usual retirement years, The Wall Street Journal has compiled a list of hot jobs for seniors here:

http://www.smartmoney.com/retirement/planning/the-new-best-jobs-for-retirees-1295567405980/

They include patient advocate. You work with medical patients to coordinate doctor’s appointments, and fill out insurance forms. The job often pays $15 an hour, or more.

Also on the list: teacher. Adjunct professors can make $30 to $40 an hour. And you don’t need a PhD. You can teach what you know at a community college or continuing education program.

And third, bookkeeper. The job usually pays at least $12 an hour… it’s very flexible, and you don’t have to be a certified public accountant.

It’s not always easy or fun to work well into your golden years. But for more and more Americans, like Quinones, retirement just isn’t an option right now.

For more resources regarding working into your retirement years, click here:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703434004576281620334179408.html