America’s first female combat pilot in Denver

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DENVER — Capt. Vernice Armour, is retired USMC and on a cross-country motivational book tour.

She spoke several places while in Denver, including Miller-Coors in Golden. Her book, “Zero to Breakthrough” outlines seven steps to mapping out a ‘flight plan’ to deal with where you are and how to get where you want to be.

Vernice Armour is America’s first combat pilot… she is also the nation’s first Black fighter pilot, earning her wings in the late 90s, before war broke out in Iraq.

“I had been the first Black female motorcycle cop in Nashville, the first Black officer in Tempe, and among all the other ‘firsts’ I happened to be trained on the AH1 SuperCobra Attack Helicopter,” said Armour, whose nickname is ‘Fly Girl’. “My military training allowed me to continue to break down walls, had I come along before 1993, when women were never allowed near the ‘front-lines’ none of the combat pilot missions would have ever been flown.”

A third-generation Marine, Armour says her time in the Corps helped her develop her message she now gives to people and companies across the globe.

“These principles are battle-tested,” said the Cobra pilot. “So, I know they work. They helped me make critical decisions that helped save lives on the ground in Iraq.”

Armour’s book can be found both on line and at local book stores in and around the metro area. It’s a very good read.